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Edgar Berryman

Canadian architect Edgar Berryman was born in 1839. He advertised himself as an architect, civil engineer, surveyor and landscape gardener.[1] He typically designed buildings in the Italianate, Gothic and French Renaissance styles.

Berryman was active in St. Catherines, Ontario from 1863 until he was appointed company architect for the Canada Southern Railway in1871 for whom he designed the Canada Southern station in St. Thomas, Ontario, and several other buildings on this massive 300-acre site, including the car shops.[2] [3]He designed the station in the Italianate style, one characterized by wide eaves with brackets, a heavy cornice, rounded windows, and a repeated symmetry of design. The larger stations in Canada, always built in cities of some size In comparison with St. Thomas, were designed in the Romanesque Revival style (Montreal’s Windsor Station which also served as the company headquarters for Canadian Pacific), Beaux Arts (Toronto) or Second Empire (Montreal). This makes this station unique within Canadian architectural history, one of the largest built In Ontario and a testimonial to Berryman’s achievement. While in St. Thomas he also designed a local residence for Richard Horsman. Berryman moved to Montreal in 1875. There he worked for and designed stations for several railway companies including the Quebec, Montreal, Ottawa and Occidental, the Grand Trunk, Quebec Central, and Montreal & Sorel Railways. He died in Montreal in 1905.[4]

[1] “Berryman, Edgar,” Biographical Dictionary of Architects in Canada 1800-1950, July 28, 2015, dictionaryofarchitectsincanada.org/node/1109.

[2] Ibid

[3] The Canadian Home Journal of March 15, 1872 states: “The plans for the principle buildings are now well advanced, and… we were permitted a full examination of them, Mr. Berryman, the architect, giving us the information which enables us to place this sketch before our readers.”

[4] David Jeanes, “Quebec, Montreal Ottawa & Occidental Railway History from Montreal Directories,” Colin Churcher’s Railway Pages, February 12, 2006, July 28, 2015, www.railways.incanada.net/circle/findings9.html.

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